Brewer's bills: New state laws you need to know

Simone Del Rosario

Photo: Video by kgun9.com

Brewer's bills: New state laws you need to know

CREATED Jun. 21, 2013

TUCSON (KGUN9-TV) - Governor Jan Brewer may have writer's cramp -- she signed 64 bills into law this week. 

The new laws range from the number of training hours you need before interning at a funeral home -- 16 -- to requiring schools stock up on epi pens in case a student has an allergic reaction.

While training to work at a funeral home may not interest most, there is a stack of new laws that will have a huge impact in Tucson and all over the state.

For instance, foster kids getting to go to college for free!

Greg Strom works with fostered teens in Tucson. He couldn't wait to tell them the good news.

"It sort of set off a spark in them," Strom said. "The one young lady that I talked to wants to become a veterinarian. She expressed to me she never thought she'd be able to have that opportunity."

But today is a new day. The bill establishes a 5-year pilot program that waives tuition for youth that are in the foster care system at age 16 or older.

"The big piece that's been missing is what happens after high school," Strom said. "This program will ensure kids get into college."

Another new law says homeowner associations can't control who gets into the houses -- not with a background check.

HOAs are officially banned from using them, and Midvale Park HOA president Robert Richter doesn't see a problem with that.

"It isn't up to us to evaluate everyone's life development," Richter said. "As long as they uphold and respect everyone else and the laws."

Last, a crackdown on the state's welfare program: Recipients can't swipe state-issued debit cards at ATMs in liquor stores, casinos or adult entertainment businesses. 

Some bills that hit the cutting room floor? Churches can't get a tax break on land they aren't using, and children can't get adopted if their parents are still fighting in court to keep them. 

The bills that did get signed into law will take effect September 12. 

Loading...