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Are kids safe walking to school?

Catalina Foothills High School sent this letter to parents and schools alerting them of what happened.

Are kids safe walking to school?

CREATED May 17, 2012

What happened to a Catalina Foothills sophomore has parents wondering if kids are safe walking to school.

Reporter: Tammy Vo

TUCSON (KGUN9-TV) - The Foothills neighborhood is the last place in Tucson where you would expect a child to be abducted. It nearly happened Wednesday morning and now parents are wondering if children are safe walking to school anymore. 

 

"Do you believe we live in a day now where parents have to reasonably fear their children walking to school?" asked KGUN 9 Reporter Tammy Vo.
 
Assistant Principal, Laura Manning of Catalina Foothills High School answered "I would hate to say we have to be afraid. We have to be alert and aware and take precautions to protect our children because anything can happen."
 
With one week until summer break, there was a mix of excitement and anxiety on the Catalina campus on Thursday after what happened to their classmate, Morgan Gregory, on Wednesday morning. Investigators say that for the fourth time in recent months, a man in a car approached the girl and tried to get her into his car. It happened most recently on Wednesday near Swan and Sunrise.
 
Asst. Principal Manning says that students, teachers and parents are looking out for the man who drove a beige four-door sedan, possibly an older model Honda or Toyota. Investigators describe the man as Caucasian, in his early to mid 30’s, medium build with dirty strawberry blonde hair.  He also has a full beard, about 1/4 inch thick which is also dirty strawberry blonde.  The suspect has light colored eyes. The Pima County Sheriff's Department has posted more information about the incident on their website.

 

Catalina Foothills High sent out an email to parents and other schools in the district. They also get the word out through social media. In the classroom on Thursday, teachers and students are talking about how to react, realizing that abductions can happen to anyone, anywhere.
 
 
"I think it surprises us anywhere in the world that people would do things to harm children. It doesn't matter the location. We would love to think we're insulated because of the area we live in but we know there are predators all over the place."