Cape Coral residents concerned about potholes

Christy Dimond

Photo: Video by fox4now.com

Cape Coral residents concerned about potholes

CREATED Aug. 12, 2013

CAPE CORAL, Fla. - Some residents in Cape Coral have taken matters into their own hands when it comes to potholes along Diplomat Parkway near Santa Barbara. 

Resident Fran Llewellyn said people are taking cones from a nearby construction site and placing them on the road around potholes to alert drivers.  
 
"They look like sinkholes, I mean they are huge," Llewellyn said. "They'll ruin your rims and if people try to avoid them they could run into another car."
 
Llewellyn said City of Cape Coral officials aren't doing enough to fix the problem.  The city has two crews of workers who repair potholes throught the city's 1,100 miles of roadways.  Spokeswoman Connie Barron acknowledged the problem and said Diplomat Parkway is one of the more "challenging" roads.  So far this year, drivers have made 23 complaints about the road. 
 
"You can only patch so much before the integrity of the road is impacted," Barron said.  
 
Repaving the road is the permanent solution to the problem but funding is the issue, she said. 
 
"We could always use more resources," Barron said. "That's been one of our concerns over the past year since we haven't quite put any dollars into our local road paving funds, so it's been a catchup type of situation we're in."
 
Llewellyn said it's time to make roads the priority. 
 
"Our taxes are going up, everything is going up... they worry about the garbage, but worry about our streets. They're not safe. And we need something done about it," she said. 
 
A majority of funds generated from the publix service tax the city recently implemented will go towards paving roadways.  Barron said major roads like Diplomat and Santa Barbara are a big priority.  
 
Anyone who sees a pothole should call the Citizens' Action Center at 239-574-0425.  Crews respond to reports about four-lane roads within 24 hours, while less-traveled roads will take two to three days, Barron said.  If a repair hasn't been made within that time frame, the city becomes liable for it.  
 

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